OBJECTIVE

To assess the national prevalence of and trends in achieving current guideline-recommended treatment goals and pharmacotherapies for primary and secondary prevention of stroke among U.S. adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D).

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

We performed serial cross-sectional analyses in 4,834 adults aged ≥45 years with T2D who participated in the 2001–2018 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. With stratification by stroke history, we estimated the proportion of adults with T2D who achieved current guideline-recommended strategies for stroke prevention. Preventive strategies for stroke were benchmarked against diabetes care and cardiovascular risk reduction guidelines.

RESULTS

Overall in 2001–2018, among those without stroke history, the proportion who achieved primary stroke prevention strategies ranged from 8.4% (95% CI 6.8–10.1) for aspirin/clopidogrel treatment in those with a higher cardiovascular disease risk to 80.5% (78.8–82.2) for nonsmoking. Among those with stroke history, the proportion who achieved secondary stroke prevention strategies ranged from 11.8% (8.7–14.8) for weight control to 80.0% (74.9–84.9) for glycemic control. From 2001 to 2018, among those without stroke history, there was a significant increase in statin therapy (Ptrend < 0.0001), smoking abstinence (Ptrend = 0.01), and ACE inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker treatment for hypertension (Ptrend = 0.04) but a substantial decline in weight control (Ptrend < 0.001). Among those with stroke history, only statin therapy (Ptrend = 0.01) increased significantly over time.

CONCLUSIONS

During 2001–2018, the achievement of some current guideline-recommended strategies for stroke prevention among U.S. adults with T2D improved but remains a challenge overall. Efforts are needed to improve implementation of strategies for stroke prevention in this population.

This article contains supplementary material online at https://doi.org/10.2337/figshare.20098127.

S.K. and C.-T.Y. have equal authorship.

Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. More information is available at https://www.diabetesjournals.org/journals/pages/license.
You do not currently have access to this content.