People with diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at high risk for kidney failure, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, heart failure, and premature mortality. Recent clinical trials support new approaches to treat diabetes and CKD. The 2022 American Diabetes Association (ADA) Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes and the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) 2022 Clinical Practice Guideline for Diabetes Management in Chronic Kidney Disease each provide evidence-based recommendations for management. A joint group of ADA and KDIGO representatives reviewed and developed a series of consensus statements to guide clinical care from the ADA and KDIGO guidelines. The published guidelines are aligned in the areas of CKD screening and diagnosis, glycemia monitoring, lifestyle therapies, treatment goals, and pharmacologic management. Recommendations include comprehensive care in which pharmacotherapy that is proven to improve kidney and cardiovascular outcomes is layered on a foundation of healthy lifestyle. Consensus statements provide specific guidance on use of renin-angiotensin system inhibitors, metformin, sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists, and a nonsteroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist. These areas of consensus provide clear direction for implementation of care to improve clinical outcomes of people with diabetes and CKD.

This article is being simultaneously published in Diabetes Care and Kidney International. The articles are identical except for stylistic changes in keeping with each journal’s style. Either of these versions may be used in citing this article.

A consensus report of a particular topic contains a comprehensive examination and is authored by an expert panel (i.e., consensus panel) and represents the panel’s collective analysis, evaluation, and opinion. The need for a consensus report arises when clinicians, scientists, regulators, and/or policy makers desire guidance and/or clarity on a medical or scientific issue related to diabetes for which the evidence is contradictory, emerging, or incomplete. Consensus reports may also highlight gaps in evidence and propose areas of future research to address these gaps. A consensus report is not an American Diabetes Association (ADA) position but represents expert opinion only and is produced under the auspices of the ADA by invited experts. A consensus report may be developed after an ADA Clinical Conference or Research Symposium.

This article contains supplementary material online at https://doi.org/10.2337/figshare.20272404.

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International Society of Nephrology, and KDIGO. Published by Elsevier Inc. and American Diabetes Association. All rights reserved, Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. More information is available at https://www.diabetesjournals.org/journals/pages/license.