Nearly 1 in 10 adults worldwide (1) and 1 in 7 adults in the United States (2) are living with diabetes. The central focus of diabetes management is control of hyperglycemia to prevent acute and chronic complications of diabetes, delay disease progression, and optimize quality of life. Additionally, person-centered diabetes care must consider a wide range of medical, psychological, and socioeconomic complexities that are associated with diabetes, hinder its management, and affect patient health and well-being.

Despite continued advances in the science of diabetes management, there have been no commensurate improvements in glycemic control, cardiometabolic risk factors, or health outcomes among people living with diabetes in the United States (3). Gaps in access to care and inequities among marginalized and underserved communities have also persisted (2,3). These gaps in care quality and outcomes can be addressed through greater availability and...

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