The prevalence of type 2 diabetes continues to increase, with >422 million individuals worldwide having a diagnosis of diabetes (1). People with diabetes are at an increased risk of mortality and macrovascular and microvascular complications such as myocardial infarction, nephropathy, and lower-limb amputations. Furthermore, a 2019 study found that almost 2 million deaths worldwide were caused by diabetes and nephropathy (1). In a continued effort to slow the increase in type 2 diabetes, new antidiabetic medications are continually being studied.

Sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are known for their use for lowering glucose, along with emerging cardiovascular benefits. However, currently only 8.3% of eligible adults with type 2 diabetes in the United States are prescribed an SGLT2 inhibitor, with racial/ethnic, sex, and socioeconomic inequities identified as possible barriers to this treatment (2). Individuals with heart failure with preserved or reduced ejection fraction, atherosclerotic cardiovascular...

You do not currently have access to this content.