Like many other diseases, diabetes and its complications involve a spectrum of many different pathophysiologic factors that are often influenced by, and even blended with, genetic and environmental factors. Because diabetes affects people of all ages, it is further complicated by individual nuances not limited to those that are medical and psychosocial. In my short 27 years in private practice caring for people with many forms of diabetes, the most common forms of diabetes I have encountered mirror the most common forms of the disease: type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Approximately half of my practice comprises people with type 1 diabetes. However, these two forms of the disease are becoming increasingly difficult to distinguish from each other. This blending of disease types, along with the dissemination of new scientific information and the development of many effective medications and management-enhancing technology devices, have made the treatment of diabetes more complex...

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