1-20 of 126 Search Results for

lxr-liver-x-receptor

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2004;53(suppl_1):S36–S42
Published: 01 February 2004
...Knut R. Steffensen; Jan-Åke Gustafsson The nuclear receptors liver X receptor (LXR)α and LXRβ are sensors of cholesterol metabolism and lipid biosynthesis. They have recently been found to be regulators of inflammatory cytokines, suppressors of hepatic glucose production, and involved in different...
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2010;59(4):800–807
Published: 26 January 2010
... downregulation required the putative liver X receptor (LXR) binding site in the human GLUT4 gene promoter in adipose tissue and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with the LXR agonist, TO901317, partially restored GLUT4 expression in etomoxir-treated cells. CONCLUSIONS Our data...
Images
Transcriptional regulation stimulated by IUB288 treatment in <em>Fxr</em>...
Published: 20 June 2018
Figure 7 Transcriptional regulation stimulated by IUB288 treatment in Fxr∆liver and WT mice. A: Gene set enrichment analysis of the 953 genes differentially expressed only in the IUB288-treated WT vs. vehicle-treated WT was used to generate top five gene ontology (GO) term-enriched pathways. B: Published chromatin immunoprecipitation–sequencing data sets were used to enrich the genes exclusively regulated in WT mice. C: FXR-dependent differentially expressed genes associated with fatty acid or BA metabolism. Liver tissues analyzed from mice in Fig. 4 . D: Proposed model of mechanisms regulating the antiobesity effects of glucagon-receptor agonism. CA, cholic acid; FDR, false discovery rate; LXR, liver X receptor; mTOR, mammalian target of rapamycin; PMID, PubMed identification number; PPARa, peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor α; PXR, pregnane X receptor; RXR, retinoid X receptor. Figure 7. Transcriptional regulation stimulated by IUB288 treatment in Fxr∆liver and WT mice. A: Gene set enrichment analysis of the 953 genes differentially expressed only in the IUB288-treated WT vs. vehicle-treated WT was used to generate top five gene ontology (GO) term-enriched pathways. B: Published chromatin immunoprecipitation–sequencing data sets were used to enrich the genes exclusively regulated in WT mice. C: FXR-dependent differentially expressed genes associated with fatty acid or BA metabolism. Liver tissues analyzed from mice in Fig. 4. D: Proposed model of mechanisms regulating the antiobesity effects of glucagon-receptor agonism. CA, cholic acid; FDR, false discovery rate; LXR, liver X receptor; mTOR, mammalian target of rapamycin; PMID, PubMed identification number; PPARa, peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor α; PXR, pregnane X receptor; RXR, retinoid X receptor. More
Images
Adiponectin and maternal obesity increased lipogenic gene expression and ac...
Published: 15 November 2012
FIG. 5. Adiponectin and maternal obesity increased lipogenic gene expression and activation in fetal livers. WT fetuses were produced by crossing HF diet–induced obese WT dams with WT sires (Scheme 1, Supplementary Fig. 1A ) (A). Adipoq−/+ and Adipoq−/− fetuses (BD) were generated by breeding Adipoq−/− dams with Adipoq−/− or Adipoq+/+ sires, which were fed with chow (Scheme 2, Supplementary Fig. 1B ). Liver samples were collected from e17.5-old fetuses, whereas dams were at fed state. The mRNA levels of the main lipogenic genes in fetal livers was measured by real-time PCR (A and D); liver tissue TG levels were compared between Adipoq−/+ and Adipoq−/− fetuses (B). Protein or phospho-protein levels were detected by Western blotting using livers from Adipoq−/+ and Adipoq−/− fetuses (C). Confluent WT and GSK3β−/− MEFs were treated with adiponectin overnight. Increased ACC1, FASN, and SREBP1c were observed in adiponectin-treated WT MEFs, but not in GSK3β−/− MEFs (E). Quantified data are presented in the bottom graph with arbitrary units (C and E). n = 8–12. *P < 0.05 vs. fetuses from lean WT dams (A), or Adipoq−/− fetuses (C and D); #P < 0.05 vs. control MEFs (E). LXR, liver X receptor. FIG. 5. Adiponectin and maternal obesity increased lipogenic gene expression and activation in fetal livers. WT fetuses were produced by crossing HF diet–induced obese WT dams with WT sires (Scheme 1, Supplementary Fig. 1A) (A). Adipoq−/+ and Adipoq−/− fetuses (B–D) were generated by breeding Adipoq−/− dams with Adipoq−/− or Adipoq+/+ sires, which were fed with chow (Scheme 2, Supplementary Fig. 1B). Liver samples were collected from e17.5-old fetuses, whereas dams were at fed state. The mRNA levels of the main lipogenic genes in fetal livers was measured by real-time PCR (A and D); liver tissue TG levels were compared between Adipoq−/+ and Adipoq−/− fetuses (B). Protein or phospho-protein levels were detected by Western blotting using livers from Adipoq−/+ and Adipoq−/− fetuses (C). Confluent WT and GSK3β−/− MEFs were treated with adiponectin overnight. Increased ACC1, FASN, and SREBP1c were observed in adiponectin-treated WT MEFs, but not in GSK3β−/− MEFs (E). Quantified data are presented in the bottom graph with arbitrary units (C and E). n = 8–12. *P < 0.05 vs. fetuses from lean WT dams (A), or Adipoq−/− fetuses (C and D); #P < 0.05 vs. control MEFs (E). LXR, liver X receptor. More
Images
Levels of FGF15/FGF19 are elevated after bariatric surgery in rodents and h...
Published: 12 March 2019
Figure 1 Levels of FGF15/FGF19 are elevated after bariatric surgery in rodents and humans. A: Schematic drawing of DJB surgery in ZF rats. The DJB procedure in rats resembles the RYGB procedure performed in humans. We hypothesized that in both DJB and RYGB, the bile, unmixed with food, is directly delivered to the distal jejunum and ileum where it induces FGF15/FGF19 expression in an FXR-dependent manner. Segments representative of the intestinal anatomy were collected in bypass and sham-operated animals. B: Top genes differentially induced by DJB surgery compared with sham procedure in ZF rats. Rats were sacrificed 14 days after surgery, and ilea were harvested for transcriptome profiling. FGF15 and Nr1h4 (also known as FXR) are shown in bold. C: Quantitative PCR analysis showing that mRNA levels of FGF15 were increased after DJB surgery in the ileum. Duodenum (in two segments), jejunum (in three segments), ileum, colon, and liver were harvested from ZF rats 14 days after sham or DJB procedures (n = 3 biological replicates per group). D: Ingenuity pathway analysis of transcriptome profiling in ZF rats (DJB surgery vs. sham procedure). The top regulated canonical pathways are ranked by −log10 (P value) with a threshold P = 0.05. Highest ranking categories are displayed along the x-axis in a decreasing order of significance. Orange bar, pathway with z score >0 (upregulated pathway); blue bar, pathway with z score <0 (downregulated pathway); gray bars, no activity pattern available. E: RYGB surgery in human patients. Serum samples were collected before surgery (baseline) and at 7 and 21 days postsurgery. F: Serum concentrations of FGF19 were increased after RYGB surgery in humans (n = 29). Fasting as well as fed (30 or 60 min after meal [30’ or 60’]) FGF19 concentrations were determined. Data are mean ± SEM. ***P < 0.001 by paired two-tailed t test. ID, identifier; LPS, lipopolysaccharide; LXR, liver X receptor; RXR, retinoid X receptor. Figure 1. Levels of FGF15/FGF19 are elevated after bariatric surgery in rodents and humans. A: Schematic drawing of DJB surgery in ZF rats. The DJB procedure in rats resembles the RYGB procedure performed in humans. We hypothesized that in both DJB and RYGB, the bile, unmixed with food, is directly delivered to the distal jejunum and ileum where it induces FGF15/FGF19 expression in an FXR-dependent manner. Segments representative of the intestinal anatomy were collected in bypass and sham-operated animals. B: Top genes differentially induced by DJB surgery compared with sham procedure in ZF rats. Rats were sacrificed 14 days after surgery, and ilea were harvested for transcriptome profiling. FGF15 and Nr1h4 (also known as FXR) are shown in bold. C: Quantitative PCR analysis showing that mRNA levels of FGF15 were increased after DJB surgery in the ileum. Duodenum (in two segments), jejunum (in three segments), ileum, colon, and liver were harvested from ZF rats 14 days after sham or DJB procedures (n = 3 biological replicates per group). D: Ingenuity pathway analysis of transcriptome profiling in ZF rats (DJB surgery vs. sham procedure). The top regulated canonical pathways are ranked by −log10 (P value) with a threshold P = 0.05. Highest ranking categories are displayed along the x-axis in a decreasing order of significance. Orange bar, pathway with z score >0 (upregulated pathway); blue bar, pathway with z score <0 (downregulated pathway); gray bars, no activity pattern available. E: RYGB surgery in human patients. Serum samples were collected before surgery (baseline) and at 7 and 21 days postsurgery. F: Serum concentrations of FGF19 were increased after RYGB surgery in humans (n = 29). Fasting as well as fed (30 or 60 min after meal [30’ or 60’]) FGF19 concentrations were determined. Data are mean ± SEM. ***P < 0.001 by paired two-tailed t test. ID, identifier; LPS, lipopolysaccharide; LXR, liver X receptor; RXR, retinoid X receptor. More
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2004;53(suppl_3):S75–S78
Published: 01 December 2004
...Alexander M. Efanov; Sabine Sewing; Krister Bokvist; Jesper Gromada Liver X receptors (LXRs) α and β, transcription factors of a nuclear hormone receptor family, are expressed in pancreatic islets as well as glucagon-secreting and insulin-secreting cell lines. Culture of pancreatic islets...
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2006;55(9):2502–2509
Published: 01 September 2006
... synthesis, and 2) decreased expression of liver X receptor (LXR)-α, LXR-β, and ATP-binding cassette transporter-1, which results in decreased cholesterol efflux. Our results indicate that in type 1 diabetes, there is altered renal lipid metabolism favoring net accumulation of triglycerides...
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2002;51(8):2426–2433
Published: 01 August 2002
..., such as cortisol. 11β-HSD-1 is particularly expressed in adipocytes and liver and appears to be causally linked to the development of type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Liver X receptor (LXR)-α and -β are nuclear oxysterol receptors whose key role in lipid metabolic regulation has recently been...
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2007;56(6):1534–1543
Published: 01 June 2007
...Sung Sik Choe; A Hyun Choi; Joo-Won Lee; Kang Ho Kim; Jun-Jae Chung; Jiyoung Park; Kyeong-Min Lee; Keun-Gyu Park; In-Kyu Lee; Jae Bum Kim Liver X receptor (LXR)α and LXRβ play important roles in fatty acid metabolism and cholesterol homeostasis. Although the functional roles of LXR in the liver...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2002;51(12):3486–3491
Published: 01 December 2002
..., lipoprotein lipase; LRP, LDL receptor-related protein; LXR, liver X receptor; PPAR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor; SR-BI, scavenger receptor class B type I. REFERENCES 1 Gervois P, Torra I, Fruchart J, Staels B: Regulation of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism by PPAR activators. Clin...
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2005;54(4):1108–1115
Published: 01 April 2005
...Eili T. Kase; Andreas J. Wensaas; Vigdis Aas; Kurt Højlund; Klaus Levin; G. Hege Thoresen; Henning Beck-Nielsen; Arild C. Rustan; Michael Gaster Liver X receptors (LXRs) are important regulators of cholesterol and lipid metabolism and are also involved in glucose metabolism. However, the functional...
Meeting Abstracts
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2018;67(Supplement_1):553-P
Published: 01 July 2018
... alterations in lipid nuclear receptors, which provide novel insight into the onset of DN. Liver X Receptors (LXR) α and β are nuclear transcription factors that respond to cholesterol or fatty acid metabolites. Nuclear LXRs control gene programs in liver cells, adipocytes, and macrophages to regulate lipid...
Images
Molecular regulators of GK expression in animals characterized in  Fig. 3 ....
Published: 13 December 2012
FIG. 7. Molecular regulators of GK expression in animals characterized in Fig. 3 . SREBP1c mRNA (A) and SREBP1 protein (B) levels, peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ (PPARγ) (C) and liver X receptor (LXR)α (D) mRNA expression, hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4 phosphorylation (E), and SHP protein expression (F) are shown. Values are means ± SEM; n values are the same as in Fig. 3 . *P < 0.05 difference versus the aCSF-treated hyperinsulinemic group. FIG. 7. Molecular regulators of GK expression in animals characterized in Fig. 3. SREBP1c mRNA (A) and SREBP1 protein (B) levels, peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ (PPARγ) (C) and liver X receptor (LXR)α (D) mRNA expression, hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4 phosphorylation (E), and SHP protein expression (F) are shown. Values are means ± SEM; n values are the same as in Fig. 3. *P < 0.05 difference versus the aCSF-treated hyperinsulinemic group. More
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2013;62(10):3384–3393
Published: 17 September 2013
...Andrea Mencarelli; Barbara Renga; Claudio D’Amore; Chiara Santorelli; Luigina Graziosi; Angela Bruno; Maria Chiara Monti; Eleonora Distrutti; Sabrina Cipriani; Annibale Donini; Stefano Fiorucci The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the liver x receptors (LXRs) are bile acid–activated receptors...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2020;69(3):448–464
Published: 27 December 2020
... nerve alterations at a structural and functional level, collectively referred to as diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). This work highlights the role of the liver X receptor (LXR) signaling pathway and the cross talk with the reactive oxygen species (ROS)–producing enzyme NADPH oxidase-4 (Nox4...
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2012;61(12):3270–3279
Published: 15 November 2012
... but with an accelerated development of acellular capillaries. This is not entirely unexpected because another model of glaucoma, the retinal ischemia–reperfusion injury model, also develops acellular capillaries ( 46 ). The liver X receptors (LXRs) are widely known for their important roles in modulating whole-body...
Images
<span class="search-highlight">Liver</span> <span class="search-highlight">X</span> <span class="search-highlight">receptor</span> expression in pancreatic islets and pancreatic cell lines....
Published: 01 December 2004
FIG. 1. Liver X receptor expression in pancreatic islets and pancreatic cell lines. A: mRNA expression of LXRα in pancreatic islets. B: mRNA expression of LXRβ in pancreatic islets. C: mRNA expression of LXRα in pancreatic cell lines. D: mRNA expression of LXRβ in pancreatic cell lines. E: LXR protein expression levels in MIN6 cells incubated for 48 h at 5 mmol/l, 25 mmol/l glucose (G), and 25 mmol/l glucose with 1 mmol/l palmitic acid (PA). FIG. 1. Liver X receptor expression in pancreatic islets and pancreatic cell lines. A: mRNA expression of LXRα in pancreatic islets. B: mRNA expression of LXRβ in pancreatic islets. C: mRNA expression of LXRα in pancreatic cell lines. D: mRNA expression of LXRβ in pancreatic cell lines. E: LXR protein expression levels in MIN6 cells incubated for 48 h at 5 mmol/l, 25 mmol/l glucose (G), and 25 mmol/l glucose with 1 mmol/l palmitic acid (PA). More
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2012;61(6):1404–1414
Published: 14 May 2012
... transcription. HDAC4/5 recruitment to the GLUT4 promoter was dependent on the GLUT4 liver X receptor (LXR) binding site. Treatment of cells with an LXR agonist prevented the cAMP-dependent decrease in GLUT4 transcription. A loss of function mutation in the LXR response element...
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2012;61(5):1062–1071
Published: 13 April 2012
... and glucocorticoid. Liver X receptor (LXR) α showed a potent and specific stimulatory effect on PFK2/FBP2 gene transcription. Deletion and mutagenesis analyses identified the LXR response element (LXRE) in the 5′-promoter region of the PFK2/FBP2 gene. Binding of LXRα was confirmed by the EMSA and ChIP assay...
Meeting Abstracts
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2020;69(Supplement_1):1888-P
Published: 01 June 2020
... were upregulated and 1077 genes were downregulated in the WAT of T-CAMCAKT T2D mice. The result indicated enhanced lipid catabolism, triglyceride catabolism, HDL assembly, and downregulated critical nuclear transcription. Pathway analysis revealed the Liver X receptor/Retinoid X receptor signaling...