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si-insulin-sensitivity-index

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Impact of sex and obesity on <span class="search-highlight">insulin</span> <span class="search-highlight">sensitivity</span>. <span class="search-highlight">Insulin</span> <span class="search-highlight">sensitivity</span> <span class="search-highlight">index</span>...
Published: 13 December 2013
Figure 1 Impact of sex and obesity on insulin sensitivity. Insulin sensitivity index was calculated in response to an IVGTT. Data are mean ± SEM. *Different from ML or FL (P < 0.05). FL, female lean (n = 11); FO, female obese (n = 11); ML, male lean (n = 13); MO, male obese (n =10); Si, insulin sensitivity index. Figure 1. Impact of sex and obesity on insulin sensitivity. Insulin sensitivity index was calculated in response to an IVGTT. Data are mean ± SEM. *Different from ML or FL (P < 0.05). FL, female lean (n = 11); FO, female obese (n = 11); ML, male lean (n = 13); MO, male obese (n =10); Si, insulin sensitivity index. More
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Assessment of <span class="search-highlight">insulin</span> <span class="search-highlight">sensitivity</span> by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamping a...
Published: 23 June 2010
FIG. 2. Assessment of insulin sensitivity by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamping after 60 h of fasting. A represents the individual data for the glucose infusion rate. B displays the group results of the insulin sensitivity index, i.e., the glucose infusion rate corrected for body weight, glucose, and plasma insulin levels during the clamp procedure. The white bar represents the fed condition whereas the black bar depicts the fasted condition. Values are mean ± SE. *P < 0.05. SI, insulin sensitivity index. FIG. 2. Assessment of insulin sensitivity by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamping after 60 h of fasting. A represents the individual data for the glucose infusion rate. B displays the group results of the insulin sensitivity index, i.e., the glucose infusion rate corrected for body weight, glucose, and plasma insulin levels during the clamp procedure. The white bar represents the fed condition whereas the black bar depicts the fasted condition. Values are mean ± SE. *P < 0.05. SI, insulin sensitivity index. More
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<span class="search-highlight">Insulin</span> <span class="search-highlight">sensitivity</span> measured using the Bergman minimal model in nonsmokers ...
Published: 15 November 2012
FIG. 2. Insulin sensitivity measured using the Bergman minimal model in nonsmokers and smokers. Data for the change in each individual are shown. Values are means ± SEM. §Significantly different than nonsmokers, P < 0.05; *significantly different after smoking cessation, P < 0.05. Si, insulin sensitivity index. FIG. 2. Insulin sensitivity measured using the Bergman minimal model in nonsmokers and smokers. Data for the change in each individual are shown. Values are means ± SEM. §Significantly different than nonsmokers, P < 0.05; *significantly different after smoking cessation, P < 0.05. Si, insulin sensitivity index. More
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The HOA diet improved <span class="search-highlight">insulin</span> secretion and <span class="search-highlight">sensitivity</span> in women. <em>A</em>...
Published: 14 March 2013
FIG. 2. The HOA diet improved insulin secretion and sensitivity in women. A: DI. B and C: Insulin sensitivity index (SI) in individual women and men measured during the HOA and HPA diets. D: SI. Relationship between diet-induced change in SI (HOA − HPA) (SI Change) and VO2peak in women (E) and men (F) (*Spearman r = 0.90; P ≤ 0.001). In women, during the HOA diet, SI correlated inversely with PCF1-Fasted (G) (***r = −0.786, P = 0.021) and PCF1-Fed (H) (**r = −0.850, P = 0.004). ***P ≤ 0.05 denotes a diet effect. FIG. 2. The HOA diet improved insulin secretion and sensitivity in women. A: DI. B and C: Insulin sensitivity index (SI) in individual women and men measured during the HOA and HPA diets. D: SI. Relationship between diet-induced change in SI (HOA − HPA) (SI Change) and VO2peak in women (E) and men (F) (*Spearman r = 0.90; P ≤ 0.001). In women, during the HOA diet, SI correlated inversely with PCF1-Fasted (G) (***r = −0.786, P = 0.021) and PCF1-Fed (H) (**r = −0.850, P = 0.004). ***P ≤ 0.05 denotes a diet effect. More
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EWAS identified association of AT CpG methylation levels with <span class="search-highlight">insulin</span> sensi...
Published: 14 September 2020
Figure 3 EWAS identified association of AT CpG methylation levels with insulin sensitivity and obesity. Genome-wide Manhattan plots showing −log10 (P values) for association of 1,054,719 CpG sites with Matsuda index (A), SI (B), and BMI (C). Q-Q plots showing distribution of observed and expected –log10 (P values) in EWAS for Matsuda index (D), SI (E), and BMI (F). DNAm levels of CpG sites in the promoter region of the TMEM88 gene are associated with glucometabolic phenotypes in AAs. Locus zoom plots showing association of methylation levels of CpG sites with Matsuda index (G), SI (H), and BMI (I). Data for CpG sites around ±2 kb of TMEM88 (which also includes 3′UTR of KDM6B) is shown. A heat map shows a correlation among CpG sites in the marked genomic region. The CpG site chr17:7757500 is marked with a star. Scatterplots show correlation of DNAm levels at the chr17:7757001–7758000 CpG region with Matsuda index (J), SI (K), and BMI (L). Figure 3. EWAS identified association of AT CpG methylation levels with insulin sensitivity and obesity. Genome-wide Manhattan plots showing −log10 (P values) for association of 1,054,719 CpG sites with Matsuda index (A), SI (B), and BMI (C). Q-Q plots showing distribution of observed and expected –log10 (P values) in EWAS for Matsuda index (D), SI (E), and BMI (F). DNAm levels of CpG sites in the promoter region of the TMEM88 gene are associated with glucometabolic phenotypes in AAs. Locus zoom plots showing association of methylation levels of CpG sites with Matsuda index (G), SI (H), and BMI (I). Data for CpG sites around ±2 kb of TMEM88 (which also includes 3′UTR of KDM6B) is shown. A heat map shows a correlation among CpG sites in the marked genomic region. The CpG site chr17:7757500 is marked with a star. Scatterplots show correlation of DNAm levels at the chr17:7757001–7758000 CpG region with Matsuda index (J), SI (K), and BMI (L). More
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The hyperbolic <span class="search-highlight">sensitivity</span>/secretion curve. It is envisioned that, in the c...
Published: 01 February 2002
FIG. 1. The hyperbolic sensitivity/secretion curve. It is envisioned that, in the course of environmentally induced reductions in insulin sensitivity, “normal” pancreatic islets would respond by upregulation of the β-cells’ sensitivity to glucose. In the example shown, individuals with an SI of 2.0 × 10−5 min−1 per pmol/l and first-phase insulin response (AIRG) of 400 pmol/l would have a disposition index [defined as the product (SI × AIRG)] of 800. Reduction in insulin sensitivity (for example, to 0.4 × 10−5 min−1 per pmol/l) would result in upregulation of AIRG to 2,000 pmol/l, with the DI remaining constant at 800. Reduction in insulin sensitivity may be due to one of several factors, including pregnancy, increased adiposity, and puberty. FIG. 1. The hyperbolic sensitivity/secretion curve. It is envisioned that, in the course of environmentally induced reductions in insulin sensitivity, “normal” pancreatic islets would respond by upregulation of the β-cells’ sensitivity to glucose. In the example shown, individuals with an SI of 2.0 × 10−5 min−1 per pmol/l and first-phase insulin response (AIRG) of 400 pmol/l would have a disposition index [defined as the product (SI × AIRG)] of 800. Reduction in insulin sensitivity (for example, to 0.4 × 10−5 min−1 per pmol/l) would result in upregulation of AIRG to 2,000 pmol/l, with the DI remaining constant at 800. Reduction in insulin sensitivity may be due to one of several factors, including pregnancy, increased adiposity, and puberty. More
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<span class="search-highlight">Indexes</span> (mean ± SE) of β-cell function and <span class="search-highlight">insulin</span> <span class="search-highlight">sensitivity</span> (Φ<sub>DEC</sub>...
Published: 01 February 2002
FIG. 4. Indexes (mean ± SE) of β-cell function and insulin sensitivity (ΦDEC, ΦDEC UP, ΦDEC DOWN, Φ, SI, Tup, and Tdown) calculated during the graded up-and-down glucose infusion experiment. *Comparison to NGT: P < 0.05. FIG. 4. Indexes (mean ± SE) of β-cell function and insulin sensitivity (ΦDEC, ΦDEC UP, ΦDEC DOWN, Φ, SI, Tup, and Tdown) calculated during the graded up-and-down glucose infusion experiment. *Comparison to NGT: P < 0.05. More
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<em>A</em>: Glucose oral minimal model with its key <span class="search-highlight">indexes</span> and sig...
Published: 01 November 2005
FIG. 2. A: Glucose oral minimal model with its key indexes and signals: insulin sensitivity (Si) and rate of appearance of ingested glucose (Ra); I, plasma insulin concentration; X, insulin action. B: C-peptide oral minimal model with its key indexes and signals: dynamic (Φd) and static (Φs) β-cell responsivity, delay of provision of new insulin (T), and insulin secretion (SR) with its dynamic (SRd) and static (SRs) components. FIG. 2. A: Glucose oral minimal model with its key indexes and signals: insulin sensitivity (Si) and rate of appearance of ingested glucose (Ra); I, plasma insulin concentration; X, insulin action. B: C-peptide oral minimal model with its key indexes and signals: dynamic (Φd) and static (Φs) β-cell responsivity, delay of provision of new insulin (T), and insulin secretion (SR) with its dynamic (SRd) and static (SRs) components. More
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Effect of cold exposure on determinants of glucose tolerance. Blood glucose...
Published: 23 January 2017
Figure 2 Effect of cold exposure on determinants of glucose tolerance. Blood glucose levels (A), plasma insulin levels (B), AIRG (C), insulin sensitivity (SI) (D), disposition index (DI) (E), SG (F), BIE (G), and the insulin-independent parameter, GEZI (H ), in fasted adult male Wistar rats that were exposed to room temperature (22°C) or the cold (4°C) for 28 h and underwent a FSIGT. Mean ± SEM. *P < 0.05 vs. room temp. Figure 2. Effect of cold exposure on determinants of glucose tolerance. Blood glucose levels (A), plasma insulin levels (B), AIRG (C), insulin sensitivity (SI) (D), disposition index (DI) (E), SG (F), BIE (G), and the insulin-independent parameter, GEZI (H ), in fasted adult male Wistar rats that were exposed to room temperature (22°C) or the cold (4°C) for 28 h and underwent a FSIGT. Mean ± SEM. *P < 0.05 vs. room temp. More
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Relationship between 2-h plasma glucose concentrations during the OGTT (OGT...
Published: 01 February 2003
FIG. 4. Relationship between 2-h plasma glucose concentrations during the OGTT (OGTT2 h), the insulin sensitivity index (SI) from frequently sampled insulin modified intravenous glucose tolerance tests (FSIGT) and the systolic blood pressure and intramyocellular lipid content in soleus muscle (IMCL-S) and in tibialis anterior (IMCL-T) in all women by linear regression analysis. FIG. 4. Relationship between 2-h plasma glucose concentrations during the OGTT (OGTT2 h), the insulin sensitivity index (SI) from frequently sampled insulin modified intravenous glucose tolerance tests (FSIGT) and the systolic blood pressure and intramyocellular lipid content in soleus muscle (IMCL-S) and in tibialis anterior (IMCL-T) in all women by linear regression analysis. More
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Endotoxemia induced IR without change in pancreatic β-cell function. Endoto...
Published: 30 September 2009
FIG. 2. Endotoxemia induced IR without change in pancreatic β-cell function. Endotoxemia suppressed the insulin sensitivity index (Si) at FSIGT testing (A), whereas there was no change in the FSIGT test-derived acute insulin response to glucose (AIRG) (B), a measure of pancreatic β-cell function. Consistent with this, the HOMA of IR fell following LPS (C), while the HOMA-B estimate of β-cell function was unchanged (D). *ANOVA P < 0.001. FIG. 2. Endotoxemia induced IR without change in pancreatic β-cell function. Endotoxemia suppressed the insulin sensitivity index (Si) at FSIGT testing (A), whereas there was no change in the FSIGT test-derived acute insulin response to glucose (AIRG) (B), a measure of pancreatic β-cell function. Consistent with this, the HOMA of IR fell following LPS (C), while the HOMA-B estimate of β-cell function was unchanged (D). *ANOVA P < 0.001. More
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 1997;46(7):1167–1171
Published: 01 July 1997
... sensitivity was determined from each FSIGTT with MINMOD and from the clamp. Insulin sensitivity indexes (SI) from the two FSIGTTs were significantly correlated (r = 0.77, P < 0.001), but SI(insuiin) was 29 ± 4% lower than SI...
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2001;50(1):150–158
Published: 01 January 2001
... (Φs [109 min-1] and Φd [109]) and the insulin sensitivity index (SI) (105 dl/kg per min per pmol/l) were estimated by using the minimal model of C-peptide secretion and kinetics originally proposed for intravenous graded...
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Effects of sleep restriction on glucose metabolism. <em>A</em> and ...
Published: 28 June 2010
FIG. 4. Effects of sleep restriction on glucose metabolism. A and B: Mean glucose levels (± SE) from IVGTT during the baseline sleep-replete condition (10 h/night TIB [black line]) and following sleep restriction for 1 week (5 h/night TIB) in subjects receiving placebo (A) (red line) modafinil (B) (green line). Left arrow, glucose infusion at time = 0 min; right arrow, insulin infusion at time = 20 min. C and D: Mean insulin levels (± SE) from IVGTT. E–H: IVGTT parameters were calculated using Minmod Millennium software. Glucose and insulin data from insulin-modified IVGTT procedures under sleep-replete (filled symbols) and sleep-restricted conditions (open symbols) are shown. E: Acute insulin response (AIRg) (first phase). F: Disposition index. G: SI from IVGTT. H: relative changes in SI from IVGTT expressed as percent change from baseline sleep-replete condition in subjects randomized to placebo (red circles) or modafinil administration (green triangles). I: Insulin sensitivity (M) from euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp procedure. J: Relative changes in insulin sensitivity (M) depicted as in F. There were no significant effects of drug administration on any metabolic parameters ( Table 1 ). FIG. 4. Effects of sleep restriction on glucose metabolism. A and B: Mean glucose levels (± SE) from IVGTT during the baseline sleep-replete condition (10 h/night TIB [black line]) and following sleep restriction for 1 week (5 h/night TIB) in subjects receiving placebo (A) (red line) modafinil (B) (green line). Left arrow, glucose infusion at time = 0 min; right arrow, insulin infusion at time = 20 min. C and D: Mean insulin levels (± SE) from IVGTT. E–H: IVGTT parameters were calculated using Minmod Millennium software. Glucose and insulin data from insulin-modified IVGTT procedures under sleep-replete (filled symbols) and sleep-restricted conditions (open symbols) are shown. E: Acute insulin response (AIRg) (first phase). F: Disposition index. G: SI from IVGTT. H: relative changes in SI from IVGTT expressed as percent change from baseline sleep-replete condition in subjects randomized to placebo (red circles) or modafinil administration (green triangles). I: Insulin sensitivity (M) from euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp procedure. J: Relative changes in insulin sensitivity (M) depicted as in F. There were no significant effects of drug administration on any metabolic parameters (Table 1). More
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 1994;43(10):1211–1217
Published: 01 October 1994
...; SI, insulin sensitivity index; BIE, basal insulin effect; GEZI, glucose effectiveness at zero insulin; IVGTT, intravenous glucose tolerance test; BMI, body mass index; N-SI, normal insulin sensitivity; R-SI, reduced insulin sensitivity. 13 8 1993 02 6 1994 02 6...
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2003;52(2):244–251
Published: 01 February 2003
...FIG. 4. Relationship between 2-h plasma glucose concentrations during the OGTT (OGTT2 h), the insulin sensitivity index (SI) from frequently sampled insulin modified intravenous glucose tolerance tests (FSIGT) and the systolic blood pressure and intramyocellular lipid content in soleus...
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2003;52(7):1779–1785
Published: 01 July 2003
... and 14.2 ± 1.6 μg/ml in men and women, respectively; P < 0.02). Plasma adiponectin had a strong association with insulin sensitivity index (SI) (r = 0.67, P < 0.0001, n = 51) that was not affected by sex, but no relation with insulin secretion...
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2002;51(8):2642–2647
Published: 01 August 2002
...). This study includes information on the directly measured insulin sensitivity index (SI) from intravenous glucose tolerance testing among African-American, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white subjects aged 40–69 years at various stages of glucose tolerance. Principal factor analysis...
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2003;52(6):1485–1495
Published: 01 June 2003
...-peptide). The insulin sensitivity index (SI) was calculated during the 20 mmol/l hyperglycemic clamp studies according to the following ( 28 ): \batchmode \documentclass[fleqn,10pt,legalpaper]{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amsmath...
Journal Articles
Journal: Diabetes
Diabetes 2003;52(1):172–179
Published: 01 January 2003
... individuals (75 men and 121 women) with an average age of 52.7 years. Subjects were subdivided into three groups based on BMI and their insulin sensitivity index (SI): lean insulin sensitive (n = 65), lean insulin resistant (n = 73), and obese insulin resistant (n = 58...