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Data and Resource Sharing and Availability

 

The American Diabetes Association supports the efforts of researchers, funders, and agencies to make underlying research data and resources more accessible, more transparent, and easier to share. As part of this effort, as of January 1, 2019, Diabetes requires authors of original research studies to describe in their papers how readers can access the data and critical resources supporting their reported findings, methods, and conclusions.

Diabetes has adapted and extended to resource sharing the following guidelines from Nature Research’s policy (available from go.nature.com/2bf4vqn):

All original research papers submitted to and published in Diabetes must provide statements about the availability of data and critical resources supporting the results reported in the article. The data and resource availability statements should be placed at the end of the “Research Design and Methods” section, under the subheading “Data and Resource Availability.”  The section should contain separate statements on 1) data sharing and 2) resource sharing.

“Data” is defined as the minimal dataset necessary to interpret, replicate, and build upon the methods or findings reported in the paper. “Critical resources” include novel genetic tools (rodent models, viral or other nucleic acid-based reagents), antibodies, compounds, or other non-commercial reagents necessary to replicate the findings in the paper. 

1) Data availability statements should include, where applicable, accession codes, other unique identifiers and associated web links for publicly available datasets, and any other conditions for access of non–publicly available datasets. Where figure source data are provided, statements confirming this should be included in data availability statements and figure legends. In cases in which data are embargoed, authors are required to state as such, to describe the reasons why data are not currently available, and if applicable state when the data will be available. This must be included in the first version of papers submitted to Diabetes for the information of the reviewers and editors

Depending on the data described in the publication, data availability statements may take one of the following forms or may be a composite of the statements below:

  • “The datasets generated during and/or analyzed during the current study are available in the [NAME] repository, [DOI or PERSISTENT WEB LINK TO DATASETS].”
  • “The datasets generated during and/or analyzed during the current study are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.”
  • “All data generated or analyzed during this study are included in the published article (and its online supplementary files).”
  • “The datasets generated during and/or analyzed during the current study are not publicly available due to [REASON(S) WHY DATA ARE NOT PUBLIC] but are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.”
  • “The data that support the findings of this study are available from [THIRD PARTY NAME] but restrictions apply to the availability of these data, which were used under license for the current study and therefore are not publicly available. Data are however available from the authors upon reasonable request and with permission of [THIRD PARTY NAME].”
  • “No datasets were generated or analyzed during the current study.”

Authors are also encouraged to include formal citations to datasets in reference lists where deposited datasets are assigned digital object identifiers (DOIs) or persistent web links by a publicly available data repository. Commonly cited data repositories include the Dryad Digital Repository (http://datadryad.org), figshare (https://figshare.com), GigaDB (http://gigadb.org), and GenBank (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank). A global registry of research data repositories can be found at http://www.re3data.org.

The citation format for datasets in reference lists is as follows:

Author(s) Last Name and First Initial. Title of dataset. Name of Repository. Date of Posting (Day Month Year). DOI or Persistent Web Link. 

2) Resource availability statements should include, where applicable, unique identifiers and/or Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs) for critical resources cited in the paper, such as novel genetic tools (rodent models, viral or other nucleic acid-based reagents), antibodies, compounds, or other non-commercial reagents necessary to replicate the findings in the paper. (More information about obtaining, citing, and requesting RRIDs is provided below.) In cases where the availability of resources is constrained, authors are required to state as such, to describe the reasons for why the resource(s) are not currently available, and if applicable state when the resource(s) will be available. This must be included in the first version of papers submitted to Diabetes for the information of the reviewers and editors

Depending on the resources described in the publication, resource availability statements may take one of the following forms or may be a composite of the statements below:

  • “The [RESOURCE] generated during and/or analyzed during the current study are available in the [NAME] repository, [PERSISTENT WEB LINK, ACCESSION NUMBER, or RRID].”
  • “The [RESOURCE] generated during and/or analyzed during the current study is available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.”
  • “The [RESOURCE] generated during and/or analyzed during the current study is not publicly available due to [REASON(S) WHY RESOURCE IS NOT PUBLIC] but are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.”
  • “The [RESOURCE] that support the findings of this study are available from [THIRD PARTY NAME] but restrictions apply to the availability of these data, which were used under license for the current study and therefore are not publicly available. [RESOURCE] may be available from the authors and/or [THIRD PARTY] upon reasonable request and with permission of [THIRD PARTY NAME].”
  • “No applicable resources were generated or analyzed during the current study.”

To obtain an RRID, visit the Resource Identification Portal at https://scicrunch.org/resources and enter your search term(s) there.

  • Search tip for antibodies: you can narrow your search by including the vendor name and/or catalog number.
  • Search tip for organisms: you can include PubMed IDs (PMIDs) in your search or filter your search results by PMID, species, phenotype, and other criteria.

For more search tips and help, contact rii-help@scicrunch.org

To format or cite an RRID, please insert "RRID:" plus the identifier in the resource availability statement and elsewhere in the manuscript, as appropriate. For example:

  • Antibodies: "Sections were stained with a rabbit polyclonal antibody against ERK1 (Abgent Cat# AP7251E, RRID: AB_2140114)."
  • Genetically modified organisms: "Subjects in this study were Fgf9Eks/Fgf9+ mice (RRID: MGI_3840442)..."

When you cannot find an RRID for a model organism or antibody that you used, you can request an RRID by submitting the reagent, as detailed below, so that it can be given proper identifiers for future use. The Resource Identification Portal includes mouse, zebrafish, worm, fruit fly, and rat model organisms as well as many commercial antibodies and some lab-sourced ones. When you cannot find an RRID for one of these five model organisms, please see the instructions at https://scicrunch.org/resources/about/guidelines#organism for submitting a new organism to the relevant model organism database. Antibodies can be added via the Antibody Registry (http://antibodyregistry.org/add); please note that login is required on that site. 

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